Shifting sands

the new model of social and environmental accountability in Integrated Reporting

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Integrated Reporting (IR) is emerging as one of the most influential new contemporary frameworks that organizations can use to disclose their social and environmental impacts. However, despite gaining support from leading multi-national companies and professional bodies, this new reporting approach has been subject to comparatively little critical scrutiny. This paper uses pragmatic stakeholder theory to assess the intent and strategies of IR, and draws on broader social theory to assess its potential effects. The paper makes three main arguments. First, IR aims to shift non-financial reporting away from traditional sustainability goals, although in some cases the interests of management rather than – as the International Integrated Reporting Council (IIRC) claims – providers of financial capital. Second, the IIRC requires an active group of long-term investors to meets its objectives. However, as social theorists such as Richard Sennett and Manuel Castells have highlighted, a characteristic of contemporary capitalism is the influence of mobile global capital. Hence, and third, the IIRC's strategy is in tension with contemporary capital market structures and trends.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 12th A-CSEAR Conference
Subtitle of host publicationsocial and environmental accounting : past, present, and future
Place of PublicationWaikato, NZ
PublisherUniversity of Waikato
Pages1-48
Number of pages48
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventAustralasian Centre on Social and Environmental Accounting Research Conference (12th : 2013) - Hamilton, NZ
Duration: 1 Dec 20133 Dec 2013

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian Centre on Social and Environmental Accounting Research Conference (12th : 2013)
CityHamilton, NZ
Period1/12/133/12/13

Keywords

  • accounting
  • environmental reporting
  • Integrated Reporting
  • social sustainability
  • stakeholder theory

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  • Cite this

    Tweedie, D., & Martinov-Bennie, N. (2013). Shifting sands: the new model of social and environmental accountability in Integrated Reporting. In Proceedings of the 12th A-CSEAR Conference: social and environmental accounting : past, present, and future (pp. 1-48). Waikato, NZ: University of Waikato.