Shop talk

revisiting business history and oral history

Matthew Bailey, Robert Crawford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article argues that oral history has the potential to extend our understandings of Australian firms, business community, industry leaders and employees, yet few academics working in these fields have integrated it into their research. To illustrate our claims, we draw on oral histories gathered from two distinct but related industries - the advertising profession and the retail property sector - focusing on the hiring process and career paths of interviewees. By revealing some of the insights we have gained from these respective projects, we forward the case for academic business historians to pay greater attention to oral history and the opportunities and insights that can be gleaned from such an approach.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages8
JournalOral History Association of Australia journal
Volume38
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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