Short-term R&D bias, competition on cost rather than innovation, and time to market

Alan S. Dunk, Alan Kilgore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mounting evidence indicates that capital markets often apply short-term pressure on firms to gain short-term results by focusing primarily on reported financial performance. As a result of short termism, it has been argued that companies are likely to cut expenditure on R&D which might otherwise improve longer-term performance. As there is a growing consensus that R&D is critically important to both organizational and national performance, short termism may have significant detrimental organizational consequences. One implication arising from a short-term R&D bias, and examined in this paper, is its effect on market time reduction. Arguments are examined that suggest a dominant R&D strategy is to reduce product time to market. Concerns have been expressed, however, that such a strategy is applicable in specific circumstances only. A review of the literature suggests that analyst and shareholder bias against high-risk, long-term research in favor of lower-risk, short-term product R&D influences organizations to reduce the time it takes to get a product to market when the emphasis in the marketplace is on cost competition rather than product innovation. The findings of the study suggest that when the emphasis on competition on cost rather than innovation is low, short-term R&D bias does not affect market time. In contrast, when the emphasis on competition on cost rather than innovation is high, the results indicate that short-term R&D bias positively influences market time reduction. The study concludes with suggestions for further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-420
Number of pages12
JournalScandinavian Journal of Management
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Competition on cost rather than innovation
  • Short-term R&D bias
  • Time to market

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