Siliceous algal and bacterial stromatolites in hot spring and geyser effluents of Yellowstone National Park

Malcolm R. Walter*, John Bauld, Thomas D. Brock

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growing algal and bacterial stromatolites composed of nearly amorphous silica occur around hot springs and geysers in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Some Precambrian stromatolites may be bacterial rather than algal, which has important implications in atmospheric evolution, since bacterial photosynthesis does not release oxygen. Conophyton stromatolites were thought to have become extinct at the end of the Precambrian, but are still growing in hot spring effluents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)402-405
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume178
Issue number4059
Publication statusPublished - 1972
Externally publishedYes

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