Simulation design for learning and assessment

Noam Ebner, Daniel Druckman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In previous work in this series, Ebner and Druckman have analyzed the widely assumed (but surprisingly unproven) benefits of role-plays, and concluded that students learn more from designing role-plays than from playing them out. Now, they take the logical next step — explicit assessment of students’ performance in simulation design. Ebner and Druckman have found it both valuable and practical to assess the concepts that students weave into the simulation instructions, the relationships constructed between them, the way the simulation design provides opportunities for integrative or distributive behavior, and the way it encourages particular communication behavior. While they find that "skill development" may be better demonstrated through participating in the role-plays resulting from the design exercise, assessment of the design phase itself proves particularly useful for increasing students’ understanding of negotiation concepts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAssessing our students
Subtitle of host publicationassessing ourselves
EditorsNoam Ebner, James Coben, Christopher Honeyman
Place of PublicationSaint Paul, Minnesotta
PublisherDRI Press
Pages139-148
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9780982794623
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameRethinking negotiating teaching series
PublisherDRI Press

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  • Cite this

    Ebner, N., & Druckman, D. (2012). Simulation design for learning and assessment. In N. Ebner, J. Coben, & C. Honeyman (Eds.), Assessing our students: assessing ourselves (pp. 139-148). (Rethinking negotiating teaching series). Saint Paul, Minnesotta: DRI Press.