Simulation of the effects of lower body wave reflection on aortic and brachial pulse in man: Implications to therapy

M. Karamanoglu*, A. Avolio, M. O'Rourke

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The asymmetric T model for the arterial system can be used to explain the major features of the aortic pulse but is not directly applicable to the peripheral pulse in the human upper limb. To explain changes in the transmitted central pulse, a multibranched model was used to investigate retrograde wave transmission, concentrating on reflected waves from the lower body effective reflecting site as determined from the T tube model. Results indicate that secondary oscillations observed in the brachial pulse originate from reflections in the lower body, and not from local reflection phenomena. This has particular relevance in vasodilator therapy since lower body reflection contributes to increased peak pressure in the central pulse but not necessarily in the brachial artery, where blood pressure is usually recorded.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBiomedical Engineering Perspectives
Subtitle of host publicationHealth Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond
EditorsPeder C. Pedersen, Banu Onaral
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages1154-1155
Number of pages2
Editionpt 3
ISBN (Print)0879425598
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Philadelphia, PA, USA
Duration: 1 Nov 19904 Nov 1990

Other

OtherProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityPhiladelphia, PA, USA
Period1/11/904/11/90

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Simulation of the effects of lower body wave reflection on aortic and brachial pulse in man: Implications to therapy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this