Single mode, extreme precision doppler spectrographs

Christian Schwab, Sergio G. Leon-Saval, Christopher H. Betters, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, Suvrath Mahadevan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The 'holy grail' of exoplanet research today is the detection of an earth-like planet: a rocky planet in the habitable zone around a main-sequence star. Extremely precise Doppler spectroscopy is an indispensable tool to find and characterize earth-like planets; however, to find these planets around solar-type stars, we need nearly one order of magnitude better radial velocity (RV) precision than the best current spectrographs provide. Recent developments in astrophotonics (Bland-Hawthorn & Horton 2006, Bland-Hawthorn et al. 2010) and adaptive optics (AO) enable single mode fiber (SMF) fed, high resolution spectrographs, which can realize the next step in precision. SMF feeds have intrinsic advantages over multimode fiber or slit coupled spectrographs: The intensity distribution at the fiber exit is extremely stable, and as a result the line spread function of a well-designed spectrograph is fully decoupled from input coupling conditions, like guiding or seeing variations (Ihle et al. 2010). Modal noise, a limiting factor in current multimode fiber fed instruments (Baudrand & Walker 2001), can be eliminated by proper design, and the diffraction limited input to the spectrograph allows for very compact instrument designs, which provide excellent optomechanical stability. A SMF is the ideal interface for new, very precise wavelength calibrators, like laser frequency combs (Steinmetz et al. 2008, Osterman et al. 2012), or SMF based Fabry-Perot Etalons (Halverson et al. 2013). At near infrared wavelengths, these technologies are ready to be implemented in on-sky instruments, or already in use. We discuss a novel concept for such a spectrograph.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationFormation, Detection, and Characterization of Extrasolar Habitable Planets
EditorsN. Haghighipour
Place of PublicationCambridge
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages403-406
Number of pages4
Volume8
ISBN (Print)9781107033825
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventIAU Symposium 293: Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union - Beijing, China
Duration: 27 Aug 201231 Aug 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Astronomical Union
No.S293
Volume8
ISSN (Print)17439213
ISSN (Electronic)17439221

Conference

ConferenceIAU Symposium 293
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period27/08/1231/08/12

Fingerprint

spectrographs
fibers
planets
etalons
main sequence stars
extrasolar planets
adaptive optics
wavelengths
radial velocity
slits
sky
stars
high resolution
diffraction
spectroscopy
lasers

Keywords

  • instrumentation: adaptive optics
  • instrumentation: spectrographs
  • techniques: radial velocities

Cite this

Schwab, C., Leon-Saval, S. G., Betters, C. H., Bland-Hawthorn, J., & Mahadevan, S. (2012). Single mode, extreme precision doppler spectrographs. In N. Haghighipour (Ed.), Formation, Detection, and Characterization of Extrasolar Habitable Planets (Vol. 8, pp. 403-406). (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union; Vol. 8, No. S293). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1743921313013264
Schwab, Christian ; Leon-Saval, Sergio G. ; Betters, Christopher H. ; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss ; Mahadevan, Suvrath. / Single mode, extreme precision doppler spectrographs. Formation, Detection, and Characterization of Extrasolar Habitable Planets. editor / N. Haghighipour. Vol. 8 Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012. pp. 403-406 (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union; S293).
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Schwab, C, Leon-Saval, SG, Betters, CH, Bland-Hawthorn, J & Mahadevan, S 2012, Single mode, extreme precision doppler spectrographs. in N Haghighipour (ed.), Formation, Detection, and Characterization of Extrasolar Habitable Planets. vol. 8, Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, no. S293, vol. 8, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 403-406, IAU Symposium 293, Beijing, China, 27/08/12. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1743921313013264

Single mode, extreme precision doppler spectrographs. / Schwab, Christian; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Betters, Christopher H.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Mahadevan, Suvrath.

Formation, Detection, and Characterization of Extrasolar Habitable Planets. ed. / N. Haghighipour. Vol. 8 Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012. p. 403-406 (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union; Vol. 8, No. S293).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

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Schwab C, Leon-Saval SG, Betters CH, Bland-Hawthorn J, Mahadevan S. Single mode, extreme precision doppler spectrographs. In Haghighipour N, editor, Formation, Detection, and Characterization of Extrasolar Habitable Planets. Vol. 8. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2012. p. 403-406. (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union; S293). https://doi.org/10.1017/S1743921313013264