Sink or swim? Response, recovery and adaptation in communities impacted by the 2010/11 Australian floods

Deanne K. Bird*, David King, Katharine Haynes, Pamela Box, Tetsuya Okada

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Queensland (northeast Australia) wet season and Victorian (southeast Australia) summer of 2010/11 were record-breaking periods. Based on climate models, the IPCC (2012) argues with medium confidence that anthropogenic influence has contributed to rainfall extremes. The research applied a mixed methods approach whereby different qualitative (face-to-face interviews, open response questions within questionnaires) and quantitative (closed questions within questionnaires) methods contributed to different aspects of the study. Many respondents (43%) were living in a singlestorey house (i.e. not raised on stumps or stilts), a single-storey duplex or a ground floor unit. As many Australian disasters occur during the summer when people are on holiday or absent from the community, a network of contacts would be extremely useful.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationApplied Studies in Climate Adaptation
EditorsJean P. Palutikof, Sarah L. Boulter, Jon Barnett, David Rissik
Place of PublicationChichester, UK
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons
Pages395-406
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781118845028
ISBN (Print)9781118845011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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