Skin color preferences in a Malaysian Chinese population

Kok Wei Tan, Ian D. Stephen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Facial skin color influences the perceived health and attractiveness of Caucasian faces, and has been proposed as a valid cue to aspects of physiological health. Similar preferences for skin color have previously been found in African participants, while different preferences have been found among mainland Chinese participants. Here, we asked Malaysian Chinese participants (ethnic Chinese living in an Asian country with high levels of exposure to Western culture) to manipulate the skin color of Malaysian Chinese, Caucasian, and African faces to make them "look as healthy as possible." Participants chose to increase skin yellowness to a greater extent than to increase skin redness to optimize healthy appearance. The slight reduction in skin lightness chosen was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparisons. While broadly in line with the preferences of Caucasian and African participants from previous studies, this differs from mainland Chinese participants. There may be a role for culture in skin color preferences, though methodological differences mean that further research is necessary to identify the cause of these differences in preferences.

LanguageEnglish
Article number1352
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
Issue numberJUN
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jun 2019

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Skin Pigmentation
Skin
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Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2019. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • face perception
  • skin color
  • perceived health
  • Asian
  • culture difference

Cite this

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Skin color preferences in a Malaysian Chinese population. / Tan, Kok Wei; Stephen, Ian D.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 10, No. JUN, 1352, 19.06.2019, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Tan, Kok Wei

AU - Stephen, Ian D.

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