Snacking while watching TV impairs food recall and promotes food intake on a later TV free test meal

Dolly Mittal, Richard J. Stevenson*, Megan J. Oaten, Laurie A. Miller

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    54 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Eating while viewing TV may impair memory of food intake and promote over-consumption on a later meal. In Experiment 1, females ate a similar amount of snack-food either with or without TV. Later, participants who had snacked with TV ate more food on a TV-free lunch and were less accurate in recalling their earlier snack-food intake. Experiment 2 explored whether the nature of the TV content might alter these effects. Using a similar design, females watched boring, sad or funny TV, or no-TV at all. Relative to the no-TV control, all TV while snacking conditions ate a similarly greater amount on the later TV-free test lunch. Recall accuracy for the snack phase was also similarly poorer in all TV conditions. These findings suggest that eating with TV per se impacts on later food intake, and a mnemonic-based explanation seems to be the best account for these findings.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)871-877
    Number of pages7
    JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
    Volume25
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

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