Social media is not real life

the effect of attaching disclaimer-type labels to idealized social media images on women’s body image and mood

Jasmine Fardouly, Elise Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This online experimental study examined the impact of viewing disclaimer comments attached to idealized social media images on 18-25 year old American women’s (N = 164) body dissatisfaction, mood, and perceptions of the target. Furthermore, this study also tested whether thin ideal internalization or appearance comparisons tendency moderated any effect. Viewing idealized images taken from social media had a negative influence on women’s body image, with or without the presence of disclaimers. Disclaimer comments also had no impact on women’s mood. They did, however, impact perceptions of the target, with women forming a less positive impression of the target if she attached disclaimer comments to her social media images. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the use of disclaimer comments or labels on social media may be ineffective at reducing women’s body dissatisfaction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4311-4328
Number of pages18
JournalNew Media and Society
Volume20
Issue number11
Early online date2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • body image
  • disclaimer labels
  • impression formation
  • social media

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