Socio-environmental models of allied health disability support: an exploration of narrative experiences in the Australian National Disability and Insurance Scheme

Mitchell N Sarkies*, Sarah Milne, Annette Davis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. The primary aims of this study were to explore: (1) manifestations of socio-environmental models of allied health support provision in the disability sector; and (2) narrative experiences of individual allied health professionals in the disability sector. Methods. A narrative qualitative study using interviews from a purposive sample of two allied health professionals working in the disability sector explored manifestations of socio-environmental models of allied health support provision and their experiences from case examples. The key informants had more than 10 years of experience in the disability support services setting. Results. Seven key themes exploring manifestations of socio-environmental models of allied health professional practice in the disability sector emerged: (1) dignity of risk; (2) models of care; (3) considerations when working in the supported person's environment; (4) goal-oriented work; (5) informed choice and informed consent; (6) reactive and flexible plans; and (7) training and education role. Conclusions. Socio-environmental models of allied health support provision in the disability sector focus on empowering people with disability to achieve their goals. This may require displacement of cultural norms within the allied health professions. What is known about the topic? Socio-environmental models of allied health support provision in the disability sector focus on empowering people with disability to achieve their goals. What does this paper add? Displacement of cultural norms within the allied health professions may be needed to promote positive risk taking. Challenges for allied health professionals remain in navigating conflicting goals between clients and family members, empowering informed choice and consent, and working in uncontrolled environments. What are the implications for practitioners? Adopting training and education roles for clients, family members and carers when implementing National Disability and Insurance Scheme plans may represent one of the many pragmatic and flexible approaches to achieve people's goals.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Health Review
Early online date29 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • disability
  • allied health
  • National Disability and Insurance Scheme
  • occupational therapy
  • rehabilitation

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