Spatial attention and saccade preparation both independently contribute to the discrimination of oblique orientations

Samantha Parker*, Andrew Heathcote, Matthew Finkbeiner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The extent to which the preparation of an eye movement and spatial attention both independently influence performance within the same task has long been debated. In a recent study that combined computational modelling with a dual-task, both saccade preparation and spatial cueing were revealed to separately contribute to the discrimination of targets oriented along the cardinal axis (horizontal and vertical). However, it remains to be seen whether and to what degree the same holds true when different perceptual stimuli are used. In the present study, we combined evidence accumulation modelling with a dual-task paradigm to assess the extent to which both saccade preparation and spatial attention contribute to the discrimination of full contrast targets oriented along the oblique axis (diagonal). The results revealed a separate and quantifiable contribution of both types of orienting to discrimination performance. Comparison of the magnitude of these effects to those obtained for cardinal orientation discrimination revealed the influence of saccade preparation and spatial attention to be six times smaller for oblique orientations. Importantly, the results revealed a separate and quantifiable contribution of both saccade preparation and spatial attention regardless of perceptual stimuli or stimulus contrast.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-343
Number of pages15
JournalAdvances in Cognitive Psychology
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

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Keywords

  • spatial attention
  • saccade
  • cueing
  • oblique orientation
  • evidence accumulation modelling
  • eye movements

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