Spatial continuity and individual variability: A review of recent work on the geography of electoral change

R. J. Johnston*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analyses have shown that the results of a series of general elections display considerable stability in the geography of voting patterns over time. Further, it has been suggested that the change between two electrons is similar in all places. This paper challenges the latter findings, using data from Great Britain and New Zealand. It is shown that even if there were a pattern of uniform swing, this would be produced by spatial variations in voter transition matrices. A review of analyses of those variations suggests the important roles of the neighbourhood effect, campaign spending, tactical voting, sectional effects, and migration as influences on voter behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-68
Number of pages16
JournalElectoral Studies
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1983

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