Spatial variability of elements in ancient Greek (ca. 600-250 BC) silver coins using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS)

Christopher E. Marjo, Gillan Davis, Bin Gong, Damian B. Gore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Archaeometrists use a variety of analytical methods to determine trace elements in ancient Greek silver coins for provenance studies, understanding social and technological change, and authentication. One analytical problem which is little documented is understanding the horizontal spatial heterogeneity of coin elemental composition in micro-sampled areas which are usually these are assumed to be uniform. This study analysed ten ancient Greek coins representative of silver circulating in the Aegean region in the sixth to third centuries BC. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to map the spatial distribution of elements on coins that were abraded to remove the patina. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was then conducted on selected coins, mapping an area ~100 x 100 µm and depth profiling from 0-10 µm. These data revealed the three-dimensional elemental complexity of the coins, in particular, the lack of heterogeneity both in the patina and beneath it. These data will guide future provenancing studies of larger sample sets of ancient Greek coins including the use of line scanning for laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) data collection rather than spot analyses, and non-destructive analytical techniques such as X-ray florescence spectrometry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S95-S100
Number of pages6
JournalPowder Diffraction
Volume32
Issue numberS2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • ancient Greek
  • numismatics
  • patina
  • elemental maps

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