Speech act performance in workplace settings

Lynda Yates*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    This chapter explores how research on speech act performance can inform language teaching for workplace communication. It argues for an approach to instruction that draws on empirical evidence from a range of perspectives so that non-native speakers can understand patterns of language use, how these relate to cultural values and how individuals actually draw on them in context. Using directives and disagreements as examples, it is argued that while quantitative interlanguage and cross-cultural speech act research studies give valuable insight into how acts are performed in routine situations, speech act studies broadly conceived are needed to provide learners with insight into the rich repertoire of devices and strategies native speakers have at their disposal and how these might be used to negotiate identities at work.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSpeech act performance
    Subtitle of host publicationtheoretical, empirical and methodological issues
    EditorsAlicia MartinezFlor, Esther Uso Juan
    Place of PublicationAmsterdam
    PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
    Pages109-126
    Number of pages18
    Volume1
    ISBN (Print)9789027219893
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Publication series

    NameLanguage Learning and Language Teaching
    PublisherJOHN BENJAMINS B V PUBL
    Volume26
    ISSN (Print)1569-9471

    Keywords

    • POLITENESS
    • JAPANESE
    • DIRECTIVES
    • WOMEN
    • POWER

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