Speech feature recognition by profoundly hearing impaired children using a multiple-channel electrotactile speech processor and aided residual hearing

Joseph I. Alcantara, P. J. Blarney, R. S C Cowan, G. M. Clark, L. A. Whitford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A group of prelinguistically profoundly hearing impaired children, between 7 and 11 years of age, were trained in the perception of vowel duration and place, the fricative /s/, and manner of articulation (/m/ vs /b/ and /s/ vs /t/) distinctions, using information provided by a multiple-channel electrotactile aid (Tickle Talker), and through aided hearing. Training was provided in the tactile-plus-aided hearing (TA) and tactile (T) conditions. Speech feature recognition tests were conducted in the TA, T, and aided hearing (A) conditions, during pretraining, training, and post-training phases. Test scores in the TA and T conditions were significantly greater than scores in the A condition for all tests, suggesting that perception of these features was improved when the tactile aid was worn. Test scores in the training and post-training phases were significantly greater than in the pretraining phase, suggesting that the training provided was responsible for the improvement in feature perception. Statistical analyses demonstrated a significant interaction between the main effects of condition and phase, suggesting that training improved perception in the TA and T conditions, but not in the A condition. Post-training and training test scores were similar suggesting that the perceptual skills acquired during training were retained after the removal of training. Recognition of trained features improved for trained, as well as for untrained words.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1260-1273
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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