Spirit and being in management

a Hedieggerian redescription of Drucker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

This paper re-describes Drucker's notion of "spirit" in terms of Heidegger's notion of Dasein as being-in-the-world. The aim of doing so is to argue that management is more than set of techniques or tools, that it is a way of being-in-the-world and that research should focus on management less in terms of an ontology of objects and more on it as a way of being. It also aims to show the importance of philosophy for management, for Heideggerian hermeneutic philosophy looks at a phenomenon from within and not in terms of the ontological distinction between subject and object which underpins the sciences and social sciences. Thus the function of Heidegger's philosophy is to provide a framework for enabling the practice of management to be explored from within. The essay also argues that looking at management as a way of being provides a framework within which to write about management as an integrated whole rather than a set of fragmented business functions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 24th ANZAM Conference
Subtitle of host publicationmanaging for unknowable futures
EditorsBruce Gurd
PublisherAustralian and New Zealand Academy of Management
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)1877040827
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventAustralia and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (24th : 2010) - Adelaide
Duration: 8 Dec 201010 Dec 2010

Conference

ConferenceAustralia and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (24th : 2010)
CityAdelaide
Period8/12/1010/12/10

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    Segal, S. (2010). Spirit and being in management: a Hedieggerian redescription of Drucker. In B. Gurd (Ed.), Proceedings of the 24th ANZAM Conference: managing for unknowable futures Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management.