Spoken English proficiency and academic performance: is there a relationship and if so, how do we teach?

Gordon Brooks, Moya Adams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

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Abstract

From a viewpoint of seeking ways to assist International students to attain their academic potential, the English usage of a group of first year students was examined and parallels found with academic performance. The implications for universities and teachers are discussed and possible teaching strategies proposed. It is acknowledged that the data did not permit a causal relationship to be concluded.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCelebrating teaching at Macquarie
Place of PublicationNorth Ryde, NSW
PublisherMacquarie University
ISBN (Print)1864087935
Publication statusPublished - 2002
EventCelebrating Teaching at Macquarie - Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 200229 Nov 2002

Conference

ConferenceCelebrating Teaching at Macquarie
CityMacquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Period28/11/0229/11/02

Bibliographical note

Publisher PDF allowed as per publisher agreement.

Keywords

  • English language proficiency
  • student learning

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