Star and cluster formation in extreme environments

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Current empirical evidence on the star-formation processes in the extreme, high-pressure environments induced by galaxy encounters (mostly based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations) strongly suggests that star cluster formation is an important and perhaps even the dominant mode of star formation in such starburst events. The sizes, luminosities, and mass estimates of the young massive star clusters (YMCs) are entirely consistent with what is expected for young Milky Way-type globular clusters (GCs). Recent evidence lends support to the scenario that GCs, which were once thought to be the oldest building blocks of galaxies, are still forming today. Here, I present a novel empirical approach to assess the shape of the initial-to-current YMC mass functions, and hence their possible survival chances for a Hubble time.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStarbursts
Subtitle of host publicationfrom 30 Doradus to Lyman break galaxies
EditorsRichard de Grijs, Rosa M. Gonzâalez Delgado
Place of PublicationDordrecht
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages157-162
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781402035395
ISBN (Print)9781402035388
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventConference on Starbursts - From 30 Doradus to Lyman Break Galaxies - Cambridge
Duration: 6 Sep 200410 Sep 2004

Publication series

NameAstrophysics and space science library
PublisherSpringer
Volume329

Conference

ConferenceConference on Starbursts - From 30 Doradus to Lyman Break Galaxies
CityCambridge
Period6/09/0410/09/04

Keywords

  • Star Formation
  • Hubble Space Telescope
  • Star Cluster
  • Initial Mass Function
  • Hubble Space Telescope Observation

Cite this

de Grijs, R. (2005). Star and cluster formation in extreme environments. In R. de Grijs, & R. M. G. Delgado (Eds.), Starbursts: from 30 Doradus to Lyman break galaxies (pp. 157-162). (Astrophysics and space science library; Vol. 329). Dordrecht: Springer, Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3539-X_27