Steering Starbugs: routing autonomous fibre positioners for TAIPAN

Nuwanthika Fernando*, Carlos Bacigalupo, Tony Farrell, Nuria Lorente

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The TAIAPAN instrument, being developed by the Australian Astronomical Optics (AAO) - Macquarie University, deploys 159 Starbug robots to position optical fibers on a 32 cm glass field plate on the focal plane of the 1.2 m UK-Schmidt telescope. The Starbug Routing algorithm created for the instrument allows the autonomous robots to reach accuracies of 0.5 arcsec of the assigned target. It employs a 3 stage tiered approach to find a collision-free path for Starbugs of increasing complexity and computational cost. For each Starbug a path is attempted using a direct simultaneous movement. If unsuccessful, subsequently more complex (and expensive) methods are tried until a valid path is found or the target is discarded. The system uses a MongoDB database to record and retrieve starbug locations and properties which allow in-situ re-routing to take place as well.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Optical Astronomical Instrumentation 2019
EditorsSimon Ellis, Céline d'Orgeville
Place of PublicationBellingham, Washington
PublisherSPIE
Pages1120316-1-1120316-5
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510631472
ISBN (Print)9781510631465
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
EventAdvances in Optical Astronomical Instrumentation 2019 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 9 Dec 201912 Dec 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
Volume11203
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Conference

ConferenceAdvances in Optical Astronomical Instrumentation 2019
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period9/12/1912/12/19

Keywords

  • Path allocation
  • Routing
  • SPIE
  • Starbug
  • TAIPAN

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