Steroid insensitive fixed airflow obstruction is not related to airway inflammation in older non-smokers with asthma

K. O. Tonga*, G. G. King, C. S. Farah, C. Thamrin, F. S. Tang, J. Santos, P. Sharma, D. G. Chapman, B. G. Oliver

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

There is limited evidence linking airway inflammation and lung function impairment in older non-smoking asthmatics with fixed airflow obstruction (FAO), which can develop despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). We assessed lung function (spirometry, forced oscillation technique (FOT)), lung elastic recoil and airway inflammation using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in non-smoking adult asthmatics with FAO, following 2 months treatment with high-dose ICS/long-acting beta-agonist. Subjects demonstrated moderate FAO, abnormal FOT indices and loss of lung elastic recoil. This cross-sectional study showed a lack of a relationship between BAL neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory cytokines and lung function impairment. Other inflammatory pathways or the effect of inflammation on lung function over time may explain FAO development.

Original languageEnglish
Article number176
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalRespiratory Research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2018

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Airway inflammation
  • Asthma
  • Fixed airflow obstruction
  • Reduced lung elastic recoil

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