Strategies of survival? Change, continuity and the adaptive cycle across the Middle to Early Late Bronze Age at Tell el-Dabˁa, Egypt

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Abstract

Ancient Egypt is considered as one of the world’s longest enduring civilisations, yet few studies have explored its history for insights on community resilience in response to institutional and social change. Instead of focussing on the collapse of the central Egyptian administration, this paper centres its analysis on a ‘community’ in the northeast of Egypt at ancient Avaris, modern Tell el-Dabˁa. Using resilience theory as metaphor, it provides an overview of developments at the site, observing periods of relative stability punctuated by those of accelerated change. It addresses how different social groups transformed in light of social and political developments by (re-)negotiating cultural elements as well as their local, regional, and supra-regional ties, and whether and how these may be interpreted as short- and long-term strategies of ‘survival’.
Original languageEnglish
Article number101367
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Anthropological Archaeology
Volume64
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2021. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Ancient Egypt
  • Hyksos Period
  • Tell el-Dab'a (Egypt)
  • Avaris (Egypt)
  • Second Intermediate Period
  • Middle Bronze Age
  • Late Bronze Age
  • foreign relations
  • Resilience Theory
  • Community resilience
  • Adaptive cycle
  • punctuated equilibrium
  • Collapse
  • Adaptive Cycle
  • Hyksos
  • Tell el-Dabˁa
  • Early Late Bronze Age

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