Stressor reflections and elite athlete psychological well-being and ill-being: an experimental test of self-distancing

Elizabeth M. Murdoch, Joanne Ayers, Monique F. Crane, Nikos Ntoumanis, Carly Brade, Eleanor Quested, Daniel F. Gucciardi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Athletes require knowledge of self-regulatory processes and skills to enact them successfully if they are to mitigate the potentially maladaptive effects of stress on functioning (e.g., psychological health, performance). Existing stress regulation interventions typically adopt a “one size fits all” approach in which individuals are taught specific skills thought to be effective for all people and all types of stressors. We test an alternative, yet complementary approach in which athletes engage proactively with stressor experiences via self-immersed or self-distanced reflections as a means by which to maximise the individualisation of stress regulation efforts. We will conduct a single blind, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial encompassed by a 2 (condition: self-distanced, self-immersed) x 2 (time: baseline and post-intervention) mixed factorial design with approximately 200 elite athletes to test these perspectives empirically. Psychological well-being and ill-being are the primary outcomes of interest, with coping insight expected the mediate the effect of stressor reflections, and curiosity and stress mindsets hypothesised to moderate the effects of stressor reflections.
Original languageEnglish
Article number101922
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

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