Student perceptions following assessment

an investigation of the effort-reward relationship and its impact on cognitions

Paul L. Nesbit, Suzan Burton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

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Abstract

Assessment plays a significant role in the learning process, with both positive and negative feedback providing useful information for students. In the case of positive feedback students are comforted in their quality and direction of their study efforts, whereas negative feedback can encourage a reassessment of study strategies and effort. However, the relationship between negative feedback and future performance is a complex one that must take into consideration the cognitions of students about the feedback process. Specifically how a student thinks about their assessment will influence their response. In this exploratory study, using post-graduate business students, we examine how assessment results influence fairness perceptions and the consequences for selfefficacy beliefs regarding future performance. Implications for teaching are also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCelebrating teaching at Macquarie
Place of PublicationNorth Ryde, NSW
PublisherMacquarie University
ISBN (Print)1864087935
Publication statusPublished - 2002
EventCelebrating Teaching at Macquarie - Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 200229 Nov 2002

Conference

ConferenceCelebrating Teaching at Macquarie
CityMacquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Period28/11/0229/11/02

Bibliographical note

Publisher PDF allowed as per publisher agreement.

Keywords

  • equity theory
  • self-efficacy
  • procedural justice.

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  • Cite this

    Nesbit, P. L., & Burton, S. (2002). Student perceptions following assessment: an investigation of the effort-reward relationship and its impact on cognitions. In Celebrating teaching at Macquarie North Ryde, NSW: Macquarie University.