Student preferences and attitudes to the use of early alerts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Learning analytics is receiving increased attention because it offers to assist higher education institutions in improving and increasing student success by automating the identification of at-risk students, thereby enabling interventions. While learning analytics research has focused on detection and appropriate interventions, such as early alerts, there has been little investigation of student attitudes and preferences towards receiving early alerts. In this paper, we report the results of a study involving three first year units that sought to determine the opinions and preferences of students on their attitudes towards the interventions; how to best contact students; their academic issues; type(s) and quality of communication with the teaching staff; and types of university services required and received. We found that the majority of students did want to be alerted, preferred to receive alerts as soon as performance was unsatisfactory, and strongly preferred to be alerted via email, then face-to-face then phone.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2015
EditorsTridib Bandyopadhyay, Daniel Beyene, Solomon Negash
Place of PublicationPuerto Rico
PublisherAmericas Conference on Information Systems
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9780996683104
ISBN (Print)9780996683104
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event21st Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2015 - Fajardo, Puerto Rico
Duration: 13 Aug 201515 Aug 2015

Other

Other21st Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2015
CountryPuerto Rico
CityFajardo
Period13/08/1515/08/15

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