Student's perceptions of generic skills for effective collaborative learning relative to student achievement

Gordon Brooks, Elizabeth More, Julian Leslie

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Collaborative and cooperative learning in small groups are generally considered effective learning approaches. Successful group activities, however, assume competence in a range of skills. This empirical paper seeks to identify whether undergraduate students with different levels of academic achievement have different perceptions of the relative importance of Ehrman and Dornyei's (1998) generic sub-skills, i.e. do high performing students emphasise different skills? Students in a first year management subject were surveyed. No differences were found between high achieving and low achieving students in terms of the importance that they place on the various generic sub-skills. Productivity focussed skills were considered most important followed by relationship and communication skills. The implications for preparing students for group work are considered.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 22nd ANZAM Conference
Subtitle of host publicationmanaging in the Pacific century
Place of PublicationAuckland, New Zealand
PublisherPromaco Conventions
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)1863081488
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventAustralian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (22nd : 2008) - Auckland, New Zealand
Duration: 2 Dec 20085 Dec 2008

Conference

ConferenceAustralian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (22nd : 2008)
CountryNew Zealand
CityAuckland
Period2/12/085/12/08

Keywords

  • skills development
  • business education
  • team building
  • interpersonal communication

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