'Studying Modern history gives me the chance to say what I think': learning and teaching history in the age of student-centred learning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article critically interrogates university history students’ ‘learning narratives’ in relation to the rise of ideas about student-centred learning in Australian universities. Drawing on interviews with third-year students, it suggests that we need to more carefully consider how students make choices about their educational activities and the ways in which some transformations in student culture may inadvertently sustain the possibility for students to ‘opt out’ of key learning activities. In short, this article calls for scholar-teachers to historicise our student cohorts carefully and use this understanding to disrupt some of the instrumentalising tendencies of late modern university life.
LanguageEnglish
Pages592-607
Number of pages16
JournalHistory Australia
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Teaching
history
learning
student
university
educational activities
narrative
teacher
interview

Keywords

  • Student-centred learning
  • history SOTL
  • university teaching
  • late modern Australia

Cite this

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'Studying Modern history gives me the chance to say what I think' : learning and teaching history in the age of student-centred learning. / Boucher, Leigh; Arrow, Michelle.

In: History Australia, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2016, p. 592-607.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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