Subjective well-being, but not subjective mental functioning shows positive associations with neuropsychological performance in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders

Katrin Schroeder*, Christian G. Huber, Lena Jelinek, Steffen Moritz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To assess the association of subjective quality of life as measured by the Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptic Treatment questionnaire (SWN-K) with neuropsychological functioning; to address interactions with the SWN-K domain mental functioning as a measure of subjective cognitive dysfunction; and to examine the interaction of subjective well-being and psychopathology ratings. Methods Forty-five patients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) were assessed regarding subjective well-being (SWN-K), neuropsychological impairment, and psychopathology (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale; BPRS). Results After controlling for multiple comparisons, SWN-K total score showed significant positive correlations with concentration/attention (r =.498), working memory (r =.537), verbal memory (r =.522), and global cognition (r =.459). No correlations of SWN mental functioning and neuropsychological impairment remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Correlations between SWN-K subscales and neuropsychological functioning were generally positive, indicating higher subjective well-being in patients with better neurocognition. In multivariate analyses, global cognition was a significant predictor (p =.011), accounting for 19.7% of SWN total score variance. Adding BPRS total score as predictor (p =.054) explained an additional 6.9% of SWN-K variance. Linear regression analyses with SWN-K mental functioning as dependent variable did not yield statistically significant models. Conclusion Subjective well-being and objective neuropsychological functioning show only moderate associations and can be seen as largely independent parameters. In particular, subjective mental functioning cannot serve as a proxy for objective neuropsychological testing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)824-830
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

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