Surgical management of complications following endoluminal grafting of abdominal aortic aneurysms

James May*, Geoffrey H. White, Weiyun Yu, Richard C. Waugh, Michael S. Stephen, Timothy McGahan, John P. Harris

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    43 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: The aim of this study was to report the outcome of endoluminal grafting of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with special reference to complications. Methods: Between May 1992 and August 1994 endoluminal repair of aneurysms was undertaken in 61 patients. In 53 the aneurysm was aortic and these are the basis of this report. In patients with AAA all procedures were elective and were performed in the operating room with the patient draped for an open repair in the event of failed endoluminal repair. The configuration of the endografts was tubular 36, tapered aortoiliac/aortofemoral 12 and bifurcated 5. Radiographic guidance was used to pass the endografts into the aorta via a delivery sheath introduced through the femoral or iliac arteries. Results: Successful endoluminal repair of AAA was achieved in 43 of 53(81%) patients. In the remaining 10 patients, endoluminal repair was abandoned in favour of an open repair. There were 17(32%) local/vascular and 13(25%) systemic/remote complications. The sum of these complications occurring in successful endoluminal repairs and those complications leading to failure of endoluminal repair was 40(75%). There were two cardiac deaths within 30 days in patients undergoing endoluminal repair (both procedure related) and four late deaths (unrelated to aneurysm repair). Three of the late deaths were in patients undergoing endoluminal repair and one endoluminal converted to open repair. Conclusion: Endoluminal repair of AAA in our experience has a low perioperative (<30 days) mortality rate (3.7%) but a high morbidity rate (75%). It is recommended that complications be classified into three groups: systemic/remote and local/vascular (following successful endoluminal repair) plus those complications leading to failure of endoluminal repair. The first group is composed of medical complications while the latter two groups comprise those surgical complications directly related to the endoluminal technique.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)51-59
    Number of pages9
    JournalEuropean Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1995

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