Syllable weight encodes mostly the same information for English word segmentation as dictionary stress

John K. Pate, Mark Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Stress is a useful cue for English word segmentation. A wide range of computational models have found that stress cues enable a 2-10% improvement in segmentation accuracy, depending on the kind of model, by using input that has been annotated with stress using a pronouncing dictionary. However, stress is neither invariably produced nor unambiguously identifiable in real speech. Heavy syllables, i.e. those with long vowels or syllable codas, attract stress in English. We devise Adaptor Grammar word segmentation models that exploit either stress, or syllable weight, or both, and evaluate the utility of syllable weight as a cue to word boundaries. Our results suggest that syllable weight encodes largely the same information for word segmentation in English that annotated dictionary stress does.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationEMNLP 2014 - 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, Proceedings of the Conference
Place of PublicationStroudsburg, PA
PublisherAssociation for Computational Linguistics (ACL)
Pages844-853
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781937284961
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, EMNLP 2014 - Doha, Qatar
Duration: 25 Oct 201429 Oct 2014

Other

Other2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, EMNLP 2014
CountryQatar
CityDoha
Period25/10/1429/10/14

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Pate, J. K., & Johnson, M. (2014). Syllable weight encodes mostly the same information for English word segmentation as dictionary stress. In EMNLP 2014 - 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, Proceedings of the Conference (pp. 844-853). Stroudsburg, PA: Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL).
Pate, John K. ; Johnson, Mark. / Syllable weight encodes mostly the same information for English word segmentation as dictionary stress. EMNLP 2014 - 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, Proceedings of the Conference. Stroudsburg, PA : Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), 2014. pp. 844-853
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Pate, JK & Johnson, M 2014, Syllable weight encodes mostly the same information for English word segmentation as dictionary stress. in EMNLP 2014 - 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, Proceedings of the Conference. Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), Stroudsburg, PA, pp. 844-853, 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, EMNLP 2014, Doha, Qatar, 25/10/14.

Syllable weight encodes mostly the same information for English word segmentation as dictionary stress. / Pate, John K.; Johnson, Mark.

EMNLP 2014 - 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, Proceedings of the Conference. Stroudsburg, PA : Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL), 2014. p. 844-853.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionResearchpeer-review

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Pate JK, Johnson M. Syllable weight encodes mostly the same information for English word segmentation as dictionary stress. In EMNLP 2014 - 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, Proceedings of the Conference. Stroudsburg, PA: Association for Computational Linguistics (ACL). 2014. p. 844-853