Systems proteomics view of the endogenous human claudin protein family

Fei Liu, Michael Koval, Shoba Ranganathan, Susan Fanayan, William S. Hancock, Emma K. Lundberg, Ronald C. Beavis, Lydie Lane, Paula Duek, Leon McQuade, Neil L. Kelleher, Mark S. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein-protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation.

LanguageEnglish
Pages339-359
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Proteome Research
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

Claudins
Proteomics
Proteins
Tissue
Tight Junction Proteins
Tight Junctions
Endothelium
Cell Differentiation
Permeability
Epithelium

Keywords

  • membrane protein complexes
  • cell-contact signaling
  • systems proteomics
  • membrane proteomics
  • targeted proteomics
  • top-down proteomics
  • chemical proteomics

Cite this

Liu, Fei ; Koval, Michael ; Ranganathan, Shoba ; Fanayan, Susan ; Hancock, William S. ; Lundberg, Emma K. ; Beavis, Ronald C. ; Lane, Lydie ; Duek, Paula ; McQuade, Leon ; Kelleher, Neil L. ; Baker, Mark S. / Systems proteomics view of the endogenous human claudin protein family. In: Journal of Proteome Research. 2016 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 339-359.
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title = "Systems proteomics view of the endogenous human claudin protein family",
abstract = "Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein-protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation.",
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Liu, F, Koval, M, Ranganathan, S, Fanayan, S, Hancock, WS, Lundberg, EK, Beavis, RC, Lane, L, Duek, P, McQuade, L, Kelleher, NL & Baker, MS 2016, 'Systems proteomics view of the endogenous human claudin protein family', Journal of Proteome Research, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 339-359. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jproteome.5b00769

Systems proteomics view of the endogenous human claudin protein family. / Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S.; Lundberg, Emma K.; Beavis, Ronald C.; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L.; Baker, Mark S.

In: Journal of Proteome Research, Vol. 15, No. 2, 05.02.2016, p. 339-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Systems proteomics view of the endogenous human claudin protein family

AU - Liu, Fei

AU - Koval, Michael

AU - Ranganathan, Shoba

AU - Fanayan, Susan

AU - Hancock, William S.

AU - Lundberg, Emma K.

AU - Beavis, Ronald C.

AU - Lane, Lydie

AU - Duek, Paula

AU - McQuade, Leon

AU - Kelleher, Neil L.

AU - Baker, Mark S.

PY - 2016/2/5

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AB - Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein-protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation.

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