Tadpoles of invasive cane toads (Bufo marinus) do not respond behaviourally to chemical cues from tadpoles of four species of Australian frogs

Mattias Hagman*, Richard Shine

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In previous work, we have shown that tadpoles of invasive cane toads (Bufo marinus) strongly avoid scent cues from crushed conspecific tadpoles. Thus, identifying the identity of the chemical involved may provide novel approaches to toad control, by manipulating the behaviour of toad tadpoles. A first step in the search for that chemical is to see whether toad tadpoles are similarly repelled by chemical cues from crushed tadpoles of other species. Our experimental trials with four native Australian frogs (three hylids, one myobatrachid) show that toads do not respond to chemical cues from these taxa. Hence, the specific chemicals that induce avoidance cannot be generic ones (e.g. body fluids, tissue fragments) but instead, must reflect some underlying chemical divergence in body composition between the tadpoles of cane toads versus the other anurans that we have tested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-213
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian Journal of Zoology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

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