Taking back the brain

Could neurofeedback training be effective for relieving distressing auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia?

Simon McCarthy-Jones*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progress in identifying the neural correlates of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) experienced by patients with schizophrenia has not fulfilled its promise to lead to new methods of treatments. Given the existence of a large number of such patients who have AVHs that are refractory to traditional treatments, there is the urgent need for the development of new effective interventions. This article proposes that the technique of neurofeedback may be an appropriate method to allow the translation of pure research findings from AVH-research into a clinical intervention. Neurofeedback is a method through which individuals can self-regulate their neural activity in specific neural regions/frequencies, following operant conditioning of their intentional manipulation of visually presented real-time feedback of their neural activity. Four empirically testable hypotheses are proposed as to how neurofeedback may be employed to therapeutic effect in patients with AVHs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)678-682
Number of pages5
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • brain-computer interface
  • hearing voices
  • psychosis

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