Tapered dipoles in briefly flashed Glass-pattern sequences disambiguate perceived motion direction

Bareena Johnson*, Peter Wenderoth

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to investigate the relationship between 'neural speedlines', form (shape), and fast motion-direction decisions, Glass patterns were constructed with dipoles assuming a tapered shape. The results of a 2-alternative forced-choice direction-discrimination task, for both concen- tric and translational Glass-pattern sequences, suggest that with short stimulus presentations (<1 s) form can influence direction decisions. This result implies that neural speedlines may be analogous to tapered lines and further supports Geisler's (1999, Nature 400 65-69) model of form/motion interaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-391
Number of pages9
JournalPerception
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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