TDP-43 proteinopathies

pathological identification of brain regions differentiating clinical phenotypes

Rachel H. Tan, Jillian J. Kril, Manaal Fatima, Andrew McGeachie, Heather McCann, Claire Shepherd, Shelley L. Forrest, Andrew Affleck, John B. J. Kwok, John R Hodges, Matthew C. Kiernan, Glenda M. Halliday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathological sequestration of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, encoded by TARDBP) into cytoplasmic pathological inclusions characterizes the distinct clinical syndromes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, while also co-occurring in a proportion of patients with Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that the regional concentration of TDP-43 pathology has most relevance to specific clinical phenotypes. This has been reflected in the three different pathological staging schemes for TDP-43 pathology in these different clinical syndromes, with none of these staging schemes including a preclinical phase similar to that which has proven beneficial in other neurodegenerative diseases. To apply each of these three staging schemes for TDP-43 pathology, the clinical phenotype must be known undermining the potential predictive value of the pathological examination. The present study set out to test whether a more unified approach could accurately predict clinical phenotypes based solely on the regional presence and severity of TDP-43 pathology. The selection of brain regions of interest was based on key regions routinely sampled for neuropathological assessment under current consensus criteria that have also been used in the three TDP-43 staging schemes. The severity of TDP-43 pathology in these regions of interest was assessed in four clinicopathological phenotypes: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 27, 47-78 years, 15 males), behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15, 49-82 years, seven males), Alzheimer's disease (n = 26, 51-90 years, 11 males) and cognitively normal elderly individuals (n = 17, 80-103 years, nine males). Our results demonstrate that the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus discriminates patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with an accuracy of 98%. The severity of TDP-43 deposited in the anterior cingulate cortex identifies patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with an accuracy of 99%. This identification of regional pathology associated with distinct clinical phenotypes suggests key regions on which probabilistic pathological criteria, similar to those currently available for Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, can be developed for TDP-43 proteinopathies. We propose and validate a simplified probabilistic statement that involves grading the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus and the severity of TDP-43 in the anterior cingulate for the pathological identification of TDP-43 proteinopathy cases with clinical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3110-3122
Number of pages13
JournalBrain
Volume138
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • TDP-43 proteinopathies
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia

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    Tan, R. H., Kril, J. J., Fatima, M., McGeachie, A., McCann, H., Shepherd, C., ... Halliday, G. M. (2015). TDP-43 proteinopathies: pathological identification of brain regions differentiating clinical phenotypes. Brain, 138(10), 3110-3122. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awv220