Teacher misconceptions about projectile motion

Anne Prescott, Michael Mitchelmore

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contribution

    Abstract

    Student misconceptions of projectile motion in the physics classroom are well documented, but their effect on the teaching and learning of the mathematics of motion under gravity has not been investigated in the mathematics classroom. An experimental unit was designed that was intended to confront and eliminate misconceptions in senior mathematics secondary school students studying projectile motion as an application of calculus to the physical world. The approach was found to be effective, but limited by the teacher's own misconceptions. It is also shown that teachers can reinforce student misconceptions of motion because they cannot understand why students have difficulty understanding it.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationIdentities, cultures and learning spaces
    Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the 29th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
    EditorsP. Grootenboer, R. Zevenbergen, M. Chinnappan
    Place of PublicationPymble, NSW
    PublisherMERGA
    Pages602
    Number of pages1
    Volume2
    ISBN (Print)1920846115
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    EventAnnual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia MERGA (29th : 2006) - Canberra
    Duration: 1 Jul 20065 Jul 2006

    Conference

    ConferenceAnnual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia MERGA (29th : 2006)
    CityCanberra
    Period1/07/065/07/06

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