Temporary labour migration and care work: the Japanese experience

Michele Ford, Kumiko Kawashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Around the world, advanced industrial societies are facing a demographic time bomb that has enormous implications for the workforce in general, but for workforce planning and industrial relations in the health sector and related industries in particular. Japan, which has traditionally resisted structured forms of labour migration, has responded by establishing labour migration schemes for nurses and other care workers from selected South and Southeast Asian countries. This article examines the responses of different industrial relations actors to the first of these schemes. It begins by describing the opening up of hospitals and residential care facilities to temporary labour migrants from the Philippines and Indonesia, before turning to a discussion of the roles played by trade unions and employers and an evaluation of the outcomes of the programme to date. The article demonstrates the potential pitfalls of trade-driven labour migration schemes and their implications for the sector and the migrant workers concerned.

LanguageEnglish
Pages430-444
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Industrial Relations
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carework
Labour migration
Industrial relations
Japan
Asian countries
Nurses
Migrant labor
Indonesia
Migrant workers
Trade unions
Philippines
Workforce
Industry
Workers
Evaluation
Workforce planning
Health sector
Demographics
Employers

Cite this

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Temporary labour migration and care work : the Japanese experience. / Ford, Michele; Kawashima, Kumiko.

In: Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 55, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 430-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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