Texts, historicity and metaphor in early China: reading "Tang Resides Near the Mound of Tang" (Tang Chuyu Tangqiu 湯處於湯丘) in the Tsinghua Collection of the Warring States (475–221 BCE) Bamboo Manuscripts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Studies of Chinese philosophical texts have mainly focused on “what” was said, rather than “how” it was said and “why” it was said the way it was. Many pre-Qin texts offer compelling evidence of identifiable formulations of the language of persuasive discourse. These texts used various rhetorical devices to convey the (semi-)hidden or complex meanings of philosophical or political messages. This paper focuses on the text Tang Resides Near the Mound of Tang (Tang chuyu Tangqiu 湯處於湯丘) in the Tsinghua collection of the Warring States (475–221 BCE) bamboo manuscripts as an example of the use of historicity and metaphor in pre-Qin writings. The use of historicity and metaphor is a rhetorical discourse that present a holistic approach to understanding the world, temporally and spatially ⸺ the human realm is seen as part of the cosmic order and, across time and space we live with the same universal principle(s).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThinking about early China with Sarah Allan
EditorsConstance Cook, Christopher Foster, Susan Blader
Place of PublicationAlbany, New York
PublisherState University of New York Press
Chapter20
Pages689-720
Number of pages32
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • ancient texts
  • ancient history
  • metaphor
  • Chinese philosophy

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