The Actions of landowner, government and planners in establishing the London green belt of the 1930s

Marco Amati, Makoto Yokohari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An area of research that has received little recent attention, is the green belt purchases of the mid-1930s. An investigation into how the green belt was implemented at this time, may help understanding of why the separation of town and country remains a feature of UK planning today. The aim of this study is to look at the resistance to the implementation of the green belt and the methods used to overcome this between 1920 and 1938. First, the historical and legislative context of the 1920s and 1930s is detailed. Then, the lead-up to the London County Council's 1935 loans scheme is investigated. Finally, a case study of the purchase of green belt land, made with such a loan is employed, and the following conclusions are drawn. The results show the important role of civil servants and landowners in allowing the green belt purchases to proceed. The significance of the various methods that are used to allow the green belt to be implemented is discussed in relation to past studies and current debates.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-12
Number of pages9
JournalPlanning history
Volume26
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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