The association between distress tolerance and cannabis use-related problems

The mediating and moderating roles of coping motives and gender

Sarah J. Bujarski, Melissa M. Norberg*, Jan Copeland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has linked distress intolerance to a greater incidence of cannabis use-related problems. Additionally, individuals reporting coping motives for cannabis use might be particularly vulnerable to use-related problems, and tendencies to use coping motives may be influenced by gender. The current study sought to extend the literature by examining the role of distress tolerance on cannabis use-related problems and the potential influences of coping motives for use and gender. Participants were 118 cannabis-using adults (Mage= 29.84). As hypothesized, highly distress intolerant individuals reported more cannabis-use related problems. Further, coping motives mediated the relationship between distress tolerance and cannabis use-related problems, and this effect was more powerful for women than for men. The current study adds to our understanding of the impact of distress tolerance and problematic patterns of cannabis use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1181-1184
Number of pages4
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

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