The Australianisation of jazz: a strange outcome of media convergence

Bruce Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The origins of this paper lie in an article I wrote for a forthcoming volume of the Encyclopaedia of Popular Music of the World on jazz outside the US, which then led me to the question of how and why jazz, a music identified so closely with both 'primitive' blackness and with US modernity, became assimilated to national identities in most of its diasporic destinations by the late twentieth century. In almost all those destinations jazz was initially regarded as deeply disruptive to the traditions, myths and power relations on which local identity was built. Yet within a matter of decades jazz was being made to feel fully at home in these diasporic sites, and by the late twentieth century it is certainly arguable that these sites had overtaken the US as the new 'centres' of jazz innovation. How was this radical reversal achieved? My paper focuses on Australia, but because the pattern is global, it will cast explanatory light on all diasporic jazz.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInstruments of change
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia-New Zealand 2010 Conference
EditorsJennifer Cattermole, Graeme Smith, Shane Homan
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherInternational Association for the Study of Popular Music
Pages53-56
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9780975774748
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventInternational Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia-New Zealand Conference - Melbourne
Duration: 24 Nov 201026 Nov 2010

Conference

ConferenceInternational Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia-New Zealand Conference
CityMelbourne
Period24/11/1026/11/10

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