The Avatar Acceptability Study

survivor, parent and community willingness to use patient-derived xenografts to personalize cancer care

C. E. Wakefield*, E. L. Doolan, J. E. Fardell, C. Signorelli, V. F. Quinn, K. M. Tucker, A. F. Patenaude, G. M. Marshall, R. B. Lock, G. Georgiou, R. J. Cohn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: Using patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) to assess chemosensitivity to anti-cancer agents in real-time may improve cancer care by enabling individualized clinical decision-making. However, it is unknown whether this new approach will be met with acceptance by patients, family and community. Methods: We used a cross-sectional structured survey to investigate PDX acceptability with 1550 individuals across Australia and New Zealand (648 survivors of adult and childhood cancer, versus 650 community comparisons; and 48 parents of childhood cancer survivors versus 204 community parents). We identified factors influencing willingness-to-use PDXs, willingness-to-pay, maximum acceptable wait-time, and maximum acceptable number of mice used per patient. Findings: PDXs were highly acceptable: >80% of those affected by cancer felt the potential advantages of PDXs outweighed the disadvantages (community participants: 68%). Survivors' and survivors' parents' most highly endorsed advantage was ‘increased chance of survival’. ‘Harm to animals’ was the least endorsed disadvantage for all groups. Cancer survivors were more willing to use PDXs than community comparisons [p < ·001]. Survivors and survivors' parents were willing to pay more [p < ·001; p = ∙004 respectively], wait longer for results [p = ·03; p = ∙01], and use more mice [p = ·01; p < ∙001] than community comparisons. Male survivors found PDXs more acceptable [p = ·01] and were willing to pay more [p < ·001] than female survivors. Survivors with higher incomes found PDXs more acceptable [p = ·002] and were willing to pay more [p < ·001] than survivors with lower incomes. Mothers found PDXs more acceptable [p = ·04] but were less willing to wait [p = ·02] than fathers. Interpretation: We found significant attitudinal support for PDX-guided cancer care. Willingness-to-pay and maximum acceptable number of mice align well with likely future usage. Maximum acceptable wait-times were lower than is currently achievable, highlighting an important area for future patient education until technology has caught up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalEBioMedicine
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • patient derived xenograft
  • acceptability
  • oncology
  • willingness-to-pay
  • informed consent

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