The British general election of 2010: A three-party contest - or three two-party contests?

Ron Johnston, Charles Pattie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Geography is an inherent component of the UK electoral system, and several separate geographies interact in the translation of votes into seats. Many argue that Great Britain now has a three-party system, but we show that it is dominated by three separate two-party systems because of the geographies of support for the three largest parties. At recent elections, the translation of votes into seats has substantially favoured the Labour Party. At the 2010 election, however, that advantage had largely disappeared, in both the constituencies where its main opponent was the Conservative Party candidate and those where it was the Liberal Democrat candidate. Removal of that pro-Labour bias in the former case resulted from the Conservatives' largely successful target seats campaign.

LanguageEnglish
Pages17-26
Number of pages10
JournalGeographical Journal
Volume177
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

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election
geography
voter
candidacy
labor
two-party system
electoral system
conservative party
Labour Party
party system
campaign
trend

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Campaigns
  • Contest types
  • Elections
  • Target seats

Cite this

Johnston, Ron ; Pattie, Charles. / The British general election of 2010 : A three-party contest - or three two-party contests?. In: Geographical Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 177, No. 1. pp. 17-26.
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The British general election of 2010 : A three-party contest - or three two-party contests? / Johnston, Ron; Pattie, Charles.

In: Geographical Journal, Vol. 177, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 17-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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