The cat in the tree–using picture descriptions to inform our understanding of conceptualisation in aphasia

Inga Hameister*, Lyndsey Nickels

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Conceptualisation is the first step of speech production and describes the process by which we map our thoughts onto spoken language. Recent studies suggest that some people with language impairments have conceptualisation deficits manifested by information selection and sequencing difficulties. In this study, we examined conceptualisation in the complex picture descriptions of individuals with and without aphasia. We analysed the number and the order of main concepts (ideas produced by ≥60% of unimpaired speakers) and non-main concepts (e.g. irrelevant details). Half of the individuals with aphasia showed a reduced number of main concepts that could not be fully accounted for by their language production deficits. Moreover, individuals with aphasia produced both a larger amount of marginally relevant information, as well as having greater variability in the order of main concepts. Both findings provide support for the idea that conceptualisation deficits are a relatively common impairment in people with aphasia.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1296-1314
    Number of pages19
    JournalLanguage, Cognition and Neuroscience
    Volume33
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Nov 2018

    Keywords

    • aphasia
    • conceptualisation
    • discourse
    • concept analysis
    • macroplanning

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