The challenge of overdiagnosis begins with its definition: Overdiagnosis means different things to different people. S M Carter and colleagues argue that we should use a broad term such as too much medicine for advocacy and develop precise, case by case definitions of overdiagnosis for research and clinical purposes

S. M. Carter, W. Rogers, I. Heath, C. Degeling, J. Doust, A. Barratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

115 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Overdiagnosis means different things to different people. S M Carter and colleagues argue that we should use a broad term such as too much medicine for advocacy and develop precise, case by case definitions of overdiagnosis for research and clinical purposes.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberh869
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalBMJ (Online)
Volume350
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2015. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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