The Cinderella syndrome? Some reflections on the under-developed role of awards in identifying and celebrating imagination, inspiration and innovation in teaching

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    While there has been an increase in the prominence and number of awards for teaching excellence in all sectors of Australian education over the last two decades, awards for excellence in teaching remain an under-developed and ambivalent part of the education landscape. Relatively little is still known about the impact of awards on recipients; on teaching and learning in the workplace; and about the relationship of awards to organizational structures promoting quality teaching, professional development and career path progression. This is consistent with the position in other jurisdictions overseas. Drawing on current research undertaken as part of the NSW Quality Teaching Awards, the paper considers the role of awards in identifying, promoting and celebrating innovative and inspirational teaching and draws out some of the implications for leadership and for further research and development.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-14
    Number of pages12
    JournalOnline Refereed Articles
    Issue number55
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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