The conservation of freshwater fishes in Australia: politics, bureaucracy and potential roles for aquarists

J. R. Merrick*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A brief description of the Australian freshwater ichthyofauna, together with a summary of the current situation relating to baseline data, research and conservation, is presented. Influences that impair development of conservation strategies are discussed and the importance of local community groups in future conservation is emphasized, with recommendations for environmental education programmes. The importance of long-term cooperation and preventive field management is also demonstrated. The experience of the one current programme (relating to the rainbow fish, Melanotaenia eachamensis Allen and Cross) showing how aquarists could and should be involved in a long-term conservation project is discussed, and five major roles are identified for aquarists. These are: provision of local baseline information; field assistance to researchers/conservation agencies; participation in captive breeding/rearing initiatives; practical involvement with natural history education; and cooperation with environmental groups involved with active catchment management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages7
JournalAquarium Sciences and Conservation
Volume1
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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