The contemporary view of biodiversity

bad science and bad policy

Andrew Beattie*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Biodiversity conservation science and policy largely ignores the majority of species: the microbes and invertebrates.This biodiversity contains most genetic, metabolic and chemical diversity on Earth and underpins a wide variety of ecosystem services, an unexpected diversity of major industries and, ironically, conventional conservation. Its exclusion, often explained by inadequate scientific technologies, is no longer tenable. On the other hand, its inclusion in biodiversity science and policy will: I) enhance understanding of the processes and mechanics of ecosystem services, 2) place biodiversity at the core of all economies, 3) realise a vast array of new biological resources, 4) extend responsibility for conservation into industrial sectors that depend on biodiversity, 5) generate a new interest in the workings of the planet through the Attenborough Effect'.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGrumpy scientists
Subtitle of host publicationthe ecological conscience of a nation
EditorsDaniel Lunney, Pat Hutchings, Harry F. Recher
Place of PublicationMosman, NSW
PublisherRoyal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Pages17-23
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9780987430908
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventAnnual Forum on Grumpy Scientists: the Ecological Conscience of a Nation - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 3 Nov 2012 → …

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Forum on Grumpy Scientists: the Ecological Conscience of a Nation
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period3/11/12 → …

Keywords

  • biodiversity
  • economics
  • bioresources
  • microbes
  • invertebrates
  • agriculture
  • biodiversity policy
  • Attenborough Effect
  • CROP YIELD
  • DIVERSITY
  • MICROBIOME
  • NITROGEN
  • SERVICES
  • BACTERIA
  • INSECTS
  • FUNGI
  • SOIL
  • AGRICULTURE

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