The Cross-Script Length Effect: Further Evidence Challenging PDP Models of Reading Aloud

Kathleen Rastle, Jelena Havelka, Taeko N. Wydell, Max Coltheart, Derek Besner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The interaction between length and lexical status is one of the key findings used in support of models of reading aloud that postulate a serial process in the orthography-to-phonology translation (B. S. Weekes, 1997). However, proponents of parallel models argue that this effect arises in peripheral visual or articulatory processes. The authors addressed this possibility using the special characteristics of the Serbian and Japanese writing systems. Experiment 1 examined length effects in Serbian when participants were biased to interpret phonologically bivalent stimuli in the alphabet in which they are words or in the alphabet in which they are nonwords (i.e., the visual characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Experiment 2 examined length effects in Japanese kana when words were presented in the kana script in which they usually appear or in the script in which they do not normally appear (i.e., the phonological characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Results in both cases showed a larger length effect when stimuli were treated as nonwords and thus offered strong support to models of reading aloud that postulate a serial component.

LanguageEnglish
Pages238-246
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Reading
stimulus
evidence
orthography
experiment
phonology
Stimulus
Reading Aloud
Length
interaction
Experiment
Alphabet
Nonwords
Kana

Cite this

Rastle, Kathleen ; Havelka, Jelena ; Wydell, Taeko N. ; Coltheart, Max ; Besner, Derek. / The Cross-Script Length Effect : Further Evidence Challenging PDP Models of Reading Aloud. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 2009 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 238-246.
@article{b2dbc07832c94a9d9541b378441af73f,
title = "The Cross-Script Length Effect: Further Evidence Challenging PDP Models of Reading Aloud",
abstract = "The interaction between length and lexical status is one of the key findings used in support of models of reading aloud that postulate a serial process in the orthography-to-phonology translation (B. S. Weekes, 1997). However, proponents of parallel models argue that this effect arises in peripheral visual or articulatory processes. The authors addressed this possibility using the special characteristics of the Serbian and Japanese writing systems. Experiment 1 examined length effects in Serbian when participants were biased to interpret phonologically bivalent stimuli in the alphabet in which they are words or in the alphabet in which they are nonwords (i.e., the visual characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Experiment 2 examined length effects in Japanese kana when words were presented in the kana script in which they usually appear or in the script in which they do not normally appear (i.e., the phonological characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Results in both cases showed a larger length effect when stimuli were treated as nonwords and thus offered strong support to models of reading aloud that postulate a serial component.",
author = "Kathleen Rastle and Jelena Havelka and Wydell, {Taeko N.} and Max Coltheart and Derek Besner",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1037/a0014361",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "238--246",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition",
issn = "1939-1285",
publisher = "American Psychological Association",
number = "1",

}

The Cross-Script Length Effect : Further Evidence Challenging PDP Models of Reading Aloud. / Rastle, Kathleen; Havelka, Jelena; Wydell, Taeko N.; Coltheart, Max; Besner, Derek.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 238-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Cross-Script Length Effect

T2 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

AU - Rastle, Kathleen

AU - Havelka, Jelena

AU - Wydell, Taeko N.

AU - Coltheart, Max

AU - Besner, Derek

PY - 2009/1

Y1 - 2009/1

N2 - The interaction between length and lexical status is one of the key findings used in support of models of reading aloud that postulate a serial process in the orthography-to-phonology translation (B. S. Weekes, 1997). However, proponents of parallel models argue that this effect arises in peripheral visual or articulatory processes. The authors addressed this possibility using the special characteristics of the Serbian and Japanese writing systems. Experiment 1 examined length effects in Serbian when participants were biased to interpret phonologically bivalent stimuli in the alphabet in which they are words or in the alphabet in which they are nonwords (i.e., the visual characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Experiment 2 examined length effects in Japanese kana when words were presented in the kana script in which they usually appear or in the script in which they do not normally appear (i.e., the phonological characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Results in both cases showed a larger length effect when stimuli were treated as nonwords and thus offered strong support to models of reading aloud that postulate a serial component.

AB - The interaction between length and lexical status is one of the key findings used in support of models of reading aloud that postulate a serial process in the orthography-to-phonology translation (B. S. Weekes, 1997). However, proponents of parallel models argue that this effect arises in peripheral visual or articulatory processes. The authors addressed this possibility using the special characteristics of the Serbian and Japanese writing systems. Experiment 1 examined length effects in Serbian when participants were biased to interpret phonologically bivalent stimuli in the alphabet in which they are words or in the alphabet in which they are nonwords (i.e., the visual characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Experiment 2 examined length effects in Japanese kana when words were presented in the kana script in which they usually appear or in the script in which they do not normally appear (i.e., the phonological characteristics of stimuli were held constant across lexical status). Results in both cases showed a larger length effect when stimuli were treated as nonwords and thus offered strong support to models of reading aloud that postulate a serial component.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58449130703&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0014361

DO - 10.1037/a0014361

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 238

EP - 246

JO - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

JF - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

SN - 1939-1285

IS - 1

ER -